The Weekly Connect 1/23/17

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the news as policymakers wrangle over implementing the law.

Is the federal government investing too much in early education? No it isn’t, federal officials say. A report from the U.S. Departments of Education and of Health and Human Services says federal investments in early education are not meeting the needs of families across the nation.

It’s not news that high school students care about what their peers think, but it is concerning that some students are willing to forego educational opportunities – such as an SAT prep course – if they think it will hurt their social image. Researchers call this “effort stigmatization.”

Health care officials in Massachusetts have come up with a program to help infants, newborns, and toddlers whose parents are addicted to opioids. S

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The Weekly Connect 1/16/17

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

The Supreme Court is considering what “some educational benefit” means as it considers a case on public school education for disabled children.

Thanks to “urban-education programs,” teachers are learning how to talk about racism so that they can communicate more effectively with their students.

Results on an international math test suggest that early childhood education might be having a positive impact on students’ math scores.

Obesity-linked diagnoses are up – and kids are eating 200 percent more fake sugar.

High school students in New York City are learning about farming – it’s a way to expose them to more career options.

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The Weekly Connect 1/9/17

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the news as educators figure out how to put the spirit of the law into practice.

Stress is driving many teachers out of their profession, and that turnover hurts schools’ efforts to educate children.

In 2016, researchers found evidence that the benefits of early education last over time – contradicting research that had found that these benefits fade.

And adults who were poor as children can experience significant psychological damage. “Why? In a word, stress.”

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The Weekly Connect 12/26/16

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

Social-emotional learning is gaining ground across states as educators increasingly see it as a way to give students an edge.

A Texas Supreme Court ruling that found the state’s inequitable school funding to be constitutional is now bumping up against research that says investing more money does improve educational outcomes. “States that send additional money to their lowest-income school districts see significantly more academic improvement in those districts than states that don’t.”

If schools started an hour later, and teenagers got more sleep, their scores on standardized tests would rise, researchers say.

Last week, researchers found that schools had more law enforcement officers than school counselors. Now Education Week reports that states are beefing up their school counseling corps.

And Massachusetts gets credit for building a world-class school system, according to the Ed Week Top Performers Blog.

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The Weekly Connect 12/19/16

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the headlines as education officials try to determine the law’s impact on funding… Advocacy groups are calling on to states to make high-achieving, low-income students a priority under ESSA accountability.

In research news, one study finds that early intervention pays off for disadvantaged students; and another study looks at income-based differences in parenting.

Around the nation, hospitals and schools stand out as hubs for building healthy communities… While federal data reveals that 1.6 million students attend schools that have on-site law enforcement officers but no school counselors.

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The Weekly Connect 12/12/16

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

The United States Department of Education has released: ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) regulations on testing as well as guidelines for students who are leaving the juvenile justice system

While homelessness is making it tough for children to attend school, the achievement gap between rich and poor students is closing.

 And as technology becomes a larger part of schoolwork, educators are warning that the “blue light” cast by mobile devices can threaten students’ sleep.

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The Weekly Connect 12/5/16

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the news. Seeking to address complaints about draft ESSA regulations, the U.S. Department of Education is giving states more time and greater flexibility in how to adhere to the law.

A recent survey underscores what we see every school day: Students are facing more challenges outside the classroom, and they need more help handling these challenges. And as we’ve blogged before, teachers are coming up with alternate sources of funding for supplies: in this case crowdsourcing.

Around the Nation, children who have health insurance still aren’t getting the care they need, and most children aren’t meeting physical activity guidelines. Education Week points to students who “Stop Out” of school (instead of dropping out), taking weeks off but ultimately returning to classes.

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The Weekly Connect 11/21/16

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These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

A new survey reveals just how much of their own money teachers use to fill gaps in educational equity; teachers tended to spend more in the poorest school districts. A New York University study finds that parents’ race and country of birth affect how teachers communicate with them.  And depression is becoming more common among U.S. teenagers.

In the good news column: preschool, when it’s done right, has lasting efforts; ACT Inc. will provide accommodations for the English Language Learners who take its college entrance exam; and mindfulness practice is making a difference in a West Baltimore school.

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