City Connects: A Promising Return on Investment

 

Shaw Elementary SchoolFor years, economists have used the term “return on investment,” or ROI, to describe business profits. Invest, for example, $100, then earn $200, and that’s a return of $2 for every dollar invested.

Now, increasingly, economists are applying ROI to public investments. Take Henry Levin, a professor of Economics and Education at Columbia University’s Teachers College.

Levin has done a benefit-cost analysis of City Connects, and found strikingly positive results.
Levin’s approach is called “the ingredients method,” and it “calculates how much money any intervention saves society by generating more taxable income, reducing the burden on the health care and public assistance and criminal justice systems, and creating more engaged citizens.”

What’s City Connects’ return on investment?  Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 1/23/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the news as policymakers wrangle over implementing the law.

Is the federal government investing too much in early education? No it isn’t, federal officials say. A report from the U.S. Departments of Education and of Health and Human Services says federal investments in early education are not meeting the needs of families across the nation.

It’s not news that high school students care about what their peers think, but it is concerning that some students are willing to forego educational opportunities – such as an SAT prep course – if they think it will hurt their social image. Researchers call this “effort stigmatization.”

Health care officials in Massachusetts have come up with a program to help infants, newborns, and toddlers whose parents are addicted to opioids. S

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

Putting Kids First: Boston nonprofits unite

City Connects is proud to join Cradles to Crayons, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston, and many other Boston-area nonprofits in a show of unity to put #KidsFirst!

thumbnail-put-kids-first

Together, Boston area nonprofits are helping to ensure that all children get the support they need to build a brighter future. #kidsfirst

Continue reading

By the Numbers: City Connects’ Impact on Immigrant Children

Mendell Elementary School

Professor Eric Dearing conducted research that looked at how immigrant children do in City Connects schools. Dearing is a professor in the department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology in Boston College’s Lynch School of Education. He’s also a faculty adviser to the City Connects Evaluation Team.

“Poverty affects not only the amount and quality of learning support a child receives, but also the likelihood of experiencing stress, chaos, and violence,” Dearing explained last year in the journal Child Development. “For immigrant children, these risks may be aggravated by language barriers, documentation status, and discrimination.”

Click here for the press release. And click here for an abstract of the study.

Here’s a look at the study by the numbers: Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 1/16/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

The Supreme Court is considering what “some educational benefit” means as it considers a case on public school education for disabled children.

Thanks to “urban-education programs,” teachers are learning how to talk about racism so that they can communicate more effectively with their students.

Results on an international math test suggest that early childhood education might be having a positive impact on students’ math scores.

Obesity-linked diagnoses are up – and kids are eating 200 percent more fake sugar.

High school students in New York City are learning about farming – it’s a way to expose them to more career options.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

The Clayton Christensen Institute Highlights Education Trends

City Connects Saint John Paul II: Columbia Campus

What will educational innovation look like in 2017?

In a recent blog post, the Clayton Christensen Institute – “a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank dedicated to improving the world through disruptive innovation” — shares its insights on key trends.

One trend: “Wraparound services will get a boost—hopefully for the sake of learning.”

“New metrics, like school climate or social and emotional progress, are likely to generate demand for interventions that attend to nonacademic factors of students’ experiences.” Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 1/9/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

ESSA (the Every Student Succeeds Act) remains in the news as educators figure out how to put the spirit of the law into practice.

Stress is driving many teachers out of their profession, and that turnover hurts schools’ efforts to educate children.

In 2016, researchers found evidence that the benefits of early education last over time – contradicting research that had found that these benefits fade.

And adults who were poor as children can experience significant psychological damage. “Why? In a word, stress.”

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

Students’ Progress Through Tiers of Risk

tier-3-figures-v-2-01

In the fall, when City Connects site coordinators sit down with teachers to do a whole class review of each child in the teacher’s class, they group students into “tiers” of risk.

Each tier defines a child’s mix of strengths and risks across all developmental domains, from the child’s academic and social-emotional traits to their physical well-being and family life. The tiers:

tier-triangle-advanced-yellow

 

In City Connects’ tier system, a child who is “getting by” in school but is socially withdrawn or acting out will still get the attention they need for their social-emotional problem.  Continue reading