The Weekly Connect 5/16/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Disruptive kindergarteners are likely to be bullied when they get to elementary school. Interventions can help. 

A White House program will offer low-cost internet access to eligible families. 

Students need summer learning programs that don’t feel like school. 

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 5/16/22”

The Weekly Connect 5/9/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Over the past year, nearly two-thirds of LGBTQ youth could not access mental health counseling.

Millions of students lack access to the broadband internet services that a 21st century education requires. 

Some cities are hiring more social workers to help students cope with Covid-driven behavioral and mental health challenges.

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 5/9/22”

Children Are Resilient: A Letter to the Editor from Dr. Mary Walsh

An April 24 article in the Boston Globe tackled the challenges educators are dealing with in the third year of the pandemic, including how to support struggling students.

“Everything I’ve trained for, everything that’s worked in the past, none of it’s working,” said Laura Messner, a middle school English language arts literacy specialist in Scituate. “I’m very worried about what’s coming down the pike if we don’t think about how we’re going to address these challenges that are not temporary challenges.”

Dr. Mary Walsh, executive director of the Center for Thriving Children and expert in developmental psychology, wrote a response to the article, focused on concrete ways to better support students and teachers.

Dr. Walsh’s letter was published last week. 

“The article “Teachers help students struggling to succeed” powerfully covers the impacts of students’ challenges. It also highlights missed opportunities for more effectively supporting student — and teacher — well-being and learning.

“Though the challenges of the current COVID-19 era are real, children are also resilient. Mental health is bolstered by a range of interventions. Mild to moderate needs can be addressed with a caring school environment; after-school programs; mentors; participation in sports, arts, or other extracurricular activities; and relationships with peers and adults, while serious mental health needs require therapeutic treatment.

“Adding more counselors and social workers to extend current strategies is unlikely to be financially viable or sufficient to meet the need. Instead, schools that create systems of support to provide every student with an individualized support plan are seeing improvements. These systems connect each child to a tailored set of resources and enrichment opportunities to address that student’s strengths and needs, drawing on resources in the school, the community, or both. These systems of “integrated student supports” are now known to improve student well-being and learning, as well as support teachers who, early research shows, are less likely to leave the profession if their school has such a system in place.”

What Dr. Walsh conveyed in her letter reflects the City Connects practice, and its evidence of positive short- and long-term impacts on student learning and thriving. To learn more about the City Connects model, click here and to learn more about best practices for integrated student support go here.

The Weekly Connect 5/2/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Pre-K enrollment drops because of the pandemic.

Children’s cabinets break down government silos to meet children’s needs.

Enrollment falls in schools that operated virtually during the pandemic. 

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 5/2/22”

The Weekly Connect 4/25/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Strategies schools can use to support students and staff who are suffering from trauma.

Factors driving restrictive policies on LGBTQ issues

Rural districts in Texas are moving to a four-day school week

To read more, click on the following links.

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The Weekly Connect 4/19/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Infants born during the pandemic vocalize significantly less and engage in less verbal “turn-taking” behaviors found to be critical for language development. 

Kansas Governor Laura Kelly signs a bill into a law that provides school children with free, basic vision screenings.

A federally funded liaison helps homeless students in rural Texas

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 4/19/22”

The Weekly Connect 4/11/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Daytime naps may preschoolers’ boost early literacy skills

A bipartisan bill in Congress would keep universal school meals through Sept. 30, 2023.

To address the pandemic-related mental health crisis among students, California teachers are taking a course called Youth Mental Health First Aid.

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 4/11/22”

The Weekly Connect 4/4/22

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about this week:

Young children can learn more from guided play than direct instruction.

President Biden’s 2023 budget seeks funding increases for high-poverty school districts and new money for mental health supports.

Aging school buildings aren’t designed for the weather extremes caused by climate change.

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading “The Weekly Connect 4/4/22”
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