The Weekly Connect 9/18/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

Scientists say social/emotion development is crucial for learning.

Later school start times could be good for the economy.

Federal government invests $20 million to support teachers of English Language Learners.

United States’ preschool enrollment lags behind other industrialized nations.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

A new policy brief on state action

 

This summer, we shared City Connects’ story at the National Conference of State Legislatures, a gathering of elected officials and their staff members. As we explained at the conference, City Connects work shows that students can achieve in school when the obstacles that they face outside school are addressed.

We explain how in a new policy brief for state lawmakers.

The brief — “Improving Student Achievement by Meeting Children’s Comprehensive Needs: State Policy Options” — explains:

“State policymakers can support children’s healthy development and learning, narrow achievement gaps, reduce dropout rates, and make it possible for communities to more efficiently use existing resources…”

Several states are taking steps in the right direction. In 2013, New Mexico passed legislation that lays out a plan for connecting school children to community resources.

To keep its schools informed about funding options, Maryland passed a law in 2016 that requires the Department of Education to notify districts about federal Title I funds that can be  used for, as the brief notes, “the coordination of school and community resources.”

And here in Massachusetts, the FY 2018 budget appropriations call for the Safe and Supportive Schools Commission to incorporate “‘principles of effective practice for integrating student supports’ into its tools for districts,” the brief says.

States are also using other strategies such as removing barriers to resource integration for students — and building infrastructure at the state level to create efficiencies and support effective practices.

Drawing on research about City Connects, the brief explains:

“Evidence demonstrates that integrated approaches to student support, when implemented with adherence to principles of effective practice, can significantly narrow achievement gaps and improve dropout rates for the growing numbers of students living in disadvantaged circumstances.”

These kinds of state actions can create conditions that help schools boost children’s learning, improve their long-term outcomes, and set examples that other states can follow.

The Weekly Connect 9/11/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

To boost reading comprehension, ask children simple questions about what they have read – including “why” questions.

President Donald Trump is ending DACA — the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It is an Obama-era effort to protect an estimated 800,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children.

New York offers free lunch for all public school children.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 9/4/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

Children who start school when they’re older do better than their younger classmates.

Children who struggle with paying attention have worse grades later in life.

Some states are cutting standardized testing to create more time for instruction.

In the midst of politically turbulent times, Philadelphia’s teachers, school staff, and school administrators are being trained to keep immigrant children safe.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 7/31/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

The benefits of nurse home-visiting programs for children and their mothers.

Grant funding for teacher training is rejected by the House Appropriations Committee.

How K-12 might be affected if the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) is overhauled.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 7/24/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

Due to a blog production issue, we’re re-sharing some news stories from last week.

Here are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

Research suggests that very early exposure to English can help ELLs.

Within limits, The Every Student Succeeds Act does let states use science, social studies, the arts, and other subjects beyond reading and math for accountability.

How severe, ongoing stress affects children’s brains.

To read more, click on the following links.

Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 7/17/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

The lasting impact of programs that teach emotional intelligence.

Some poor schools have “STEM deserts,” fewer resources in science, technology, engineering, and math.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and her team have to tackle the big job of implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Online camps can keep kids connected to STEM activities and mentors year-round.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading

The Weekly Connect 7/10/17

Here’s the new edition of The Weekly Connect. Check it out and sign up to have it delivered to your inbox!

These are some of the things we’ve been reading about:

A study looks at the hidden financial costs of bullying.

U.S. Supreme Court cases on education.

How increasing social-emotional learning can boost graduation rates for students of color.

The Chicago Public Schools system has a new graduation requirement.

To read more, click on the following links. Continue reading